Starting a new adventure: building a small boat

The idea has been brewing in my mind for many years. I’ve been pondering a way to reconcile my love of simple self propelled travelling with having two young children. I want to be able to share the experiences, while not inoculating them from every wanting to do it again when they are older. So my wandering mind has settled on a plan that will satisfy many requirements.

I would like to build a small wooden sailboat.

  • Seaworthy enough to sail up and down the inside passage from Vancouver to Cortez Island and maybe even up the inside passage up to the Broughton Archipelago or Prince Rupert.
  • Capable of taking my whole family with camping equipment and food for several days
  • Able to sail in light to strong winds
  • Able to be rowed comfortably by one or two people when there is no wind.
  • Capable to accommodate sleeping aboard when in still water with a canvass boom tent and plenty stowage for equipment and food.
  • Beachable, so that people and equipment can easily be brought to shore in remote locations.
  • Can be stored on trailer on land or in the water
  • A small motor well or mount when conditions and distances warrant.

So these parameters in themselves do narrow down the possibilities somewhat. But the key determinants of narrowing it down to a smaller list might be the subjective design qualities. The intangible special sauce that mixes function and form into a beautiful seaworthy sailboat. The final element is one of size, how small is too small for a family of four? Would an open boat on a typically rainy west coast day be too miserable for my family? Does the boat have to have a cabin or could we manage without?

Caledonia Yawl
The Caledonia Yawl sail configuration I chose

Building maintenance

A few days ago I discovered that raccoons had managed to rip a hole in our bike storage room and were threatening to make it a permanent home. After a brief standoff where we stared each other down they left long enough for me to consider a repair. Not wanting to do things half way I went to the hardware store to get enough hardieplank cement fibre siding to replace the whole affected area and deter future encounters with my unwanted guests.

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I managed to get it all on the bike, but the hardieplank was a little heavier than expected and I was getting close to the capacity of the bike.

Boxing Day: everyone has their own traditions

In the spirit of making memories and not garbage; I met with my friends Ian, Dominique and Frederich for a stand up paddle around English Bay. Starting at the place that links us all. The Jericho Sailing Centre somehow courses through our veins, with a deep connection to the ocean, non powered recreation and fun.

Boxing Day paddle

We met at 9:30am and set out to paddle around the tugboat boy just west of the entrance to False Creek. There we met two busy bald eagles who had taken up temporary residence to feast on what seemed to be a recently caught seagull carcass.

Boxing Day paddle in English bay. Watched two eagles eating a seagull on the tugboat bouy

Eagle on Tugboat Boy
We the headed west with the current and paid a visit to one of the dozen freighters at anchor waiting in the bay for its turn to load up on Canadian cargo.
The weather could not have been milder, I was overheating a little in my wetsuit. I was very happy to spend my Boxing Day morning this way.

Freighter Bulb4

Freighter Bulb

 

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