Tag Archives: sanding

Caledonia yawl project: preparing the gunwhales

This weekend the weather started to turn through the day on Saturday. In the morning it was wet and warmish. But as the day wore on the forcast bore itself out and the temperatures dropped steadily to -9 overnight. With this in mind I decided to forego any gluing and do more things that would set me up for some productive days of gluing when the temperatures start to rise.

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I started by sanding all the fillets I had done in all the interior laps. The last set of fillets I plan on doing are between the aprons (inner stems) and the planking. This will strengthen the bond and present a better surface for painting and keeping clean.

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I also cut all the scarfs needed to lay up three laminations od 1/2 ´´ thick Douglas fir that will be  nearly 21’ long once glued up.  I just found that my last pieces were a little knotty with some grain runout and so I could only get 8’ out of them. I will need to get two more lengths of 13’ 1/2” strips to have all the materials ready.

Caledonia yawl project: sanding, fairing & more sanding

This is the part where the changes are almost imperceptible but where so much of the final appearance of the boat rests.

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I’ve sanded and added low density fairing epoxy filler to the parts that needed it. Then the process of sanding continues. Each time a thin layer of dusts covers the hull everything appears more fair and smooth. This dangerous as I have learned when mudding drywall, what lies beneath needs to be exposed to be sure there aren’t any bumps, holes, bubbles or ripples that would be even more apparent once the paint is applied.

Caledonia Yawl: hull preparation

The work has progressed in small increments on the hull. Each step did not really reveal a significant visual transformation that might show up on the camera. But they are small changes that will allow the hull to look great once painted.
I glued up the keel and the stems:
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and after a few repeat visits added the keel pieced on either side of the centreboard slot.
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Then we got to work sanding and planing down the keel and stems so that they were fair to the eye.
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and distracted myself with paint selection ideas:
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and put fillets of epoxy mixed with low density fairing filler in all the laps.
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I then decided to add a small rub strip of wood on the lower edge of the sheer strake. The idea being that I like the way in helps to frame the sheer strake and that it might also serve a small function as well.
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The last step before really getting down to the final preparation for painting is the outer gunwhale.
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Caledonia yawl project: final shaping of rudder and centreboard 

Experience in working on gyprock and mudding all the joints and corners and having to then sand them down to a fair blend to the straight board stock, is that it is worth spending a little more time sanding even if to the eye and to the fingers it appears to be smooth. 
  
Once I add the unidirectional carbon fibre and epoxy I will certainly discover new spots that are not quite right for the centreboard and rudder NACA profiles. Sanding down epoxy is much harder than bare cedar.

I’m feeling fairly confident about the shape now and I’m looking forward to adding the epoxy and carbon fibre.

   
 

  
This beautiful cedar will soon disappear behind layers of carbon, Kevlar and graphite. The only part of the boat I felt would benefit from additional strength beyond just wood fivers.

Caledonia yawl project: kerfs, planing and sanding

With a bit of further reading and some confidence building after my first set of kerfs on the starboard side of the centreboard I’m back to work on the port side.

 

It is slower progress but hand planing really makes you feel the wood and control the shape.
  
 

After removing the bulk of the material with the power planer, I switched to the small block plane which seemed to work better than the larger plane with the cedar and the curves. It also is pleasant to work making almost no noise and creating nice wood shavings and no dust.

For the transition to the part of the centreboard that pivots I need to use my random orbit sander with 60 grit. Ideally I’d like to use a disk sander or a belt sander.