Tag Archives: epoxy

The seventh strakes (sheerstrake) and the Whiskey plank

The last two strakes,  are called the sheerstrakes as they  mark the sheer line of the boat’s profile.  The month of December has been colder than usual and so the progress has been arrested a little as I waited for the weather windows when the temperature is above 5°C or close enough so that the epoxy will set.

I was able to get the starboard sheerstrake glued early in December,  but the port Sheerstrake had to wait for the Christmas break.

Strake 7

    Starboard strake no. 7
Port seventh strake all glued up.
Seen from inside where I crawl to remove any squeeze out glue

All glued up and ready for the outer stems soon

Once the glue set for the port side I was able to declare the hull complete.  Tradition has it that the occasion is celebrated with with a little whiskey.

Next up is the planing of the bow and stern stems so that I can glue the outer stem pieces I made earlier.

Caledonia yawl project: cutting the gains on the garboard 

Today I tackled something new, cutting  the gains on the garboard so that the second strake appears to taper nicely to meet the profile of the garboard as it gets to the bow and stern stem.

To accomplish this I needed a rebate or a shoulder plane, which I don’t yet have in my tool kit. So I got a membership to the Vancouver Tool Library to allow me to access the tools I don’t yet have. As you might imagine shoulder planes or rebate planes are not super common tools, but they are precisely what makes the tool library such a wonderful service. I can easily imagine some kind of franchise where clusters of a few blocks have something similar.

Continue reading Caledonia yawl project: cutting the gains on the garboard 

Caledonia yawl project: laminating the knees and carbon on centreboard

Today I helped my friend get a new fridge in a house where the widest door was 28″ wide. We had to take apart the sliding door.

 

everything is back together but you can see the areas where i dug out the nails
 
This evening I managed to get a couple hours and I put the unidirectional carbon fibre on one side of the centreboard. I wet the surface with epoxy and the layed it down and squeegeed more epoxy onto the surface.

  
It’s not perfectly smooth, but I’m happy with the result. I’ll be covering it with graphite epoxy soon and that will be sanded smooth.

I also started laminating the knees that will connect the thwart to the gunnels.

  

I used 2 1/4 thick fir lamimations left over from making the stems. With some luck ill be able to cut them down the centreline and get two knees out of each one.

Caledonia Yawl project: laying Kevlar on the rudder blade

This probably lies somewhere between overkill and preventative engineering. I decided to lay some Kevlar fiber on the rudder and centreboard leading edges to deal with the wear and tear of a beach boat that will regularly come in contact with the shoreline and may at times bump up against the sand, gravel or rocks on the shoreline. In our part of the world floating or partially submerged logs and driftwood are also a concern.

Kevlar wrap over the leading edge
Kevlar wrap over the leading edge of the rudder
Continue reading Caledonia Yawl project: laying Kevlar on the rudder blade

Caledonia yawl project: Buying the keelson lumber and preparing the centreboard 

Back out to Fibertek to buy more epoxy with my assistant.

The apron and stems took much more expoxy than I had anticipated. This time I splurged and bought the gallon of resin and hope that I won’t have to make a trip back here soon.  Note that the 15′ 2×6 douglas fir on the Larry vs. Harry handled fine.

Continue reading Caledonia yawl project: Buying the keelson lumber and preparing the centreboard 

Caledonia yawl project: planing the bow apron and stem

Having access to a thickness planer makes this activity much easier and more precise. I was able with relative ease to plane the whole length of both the apron and stem down to the specified thickness on my own. I did spend some time fretting about keeping the angles square and not ending up with a weird parallelogram that would give the bow a weird twist. fortunately the thickness planer coupled with a square and some judicious hand planing kept everything progressing smoothly. When planing the apron down to the right 2″ thickness i was sure to keep checking that it was square.

Continue reading Caledonia yawl project: planing the bow apron and stem

Caledonia yawl project: gluing the bow stem

When I ripped the strips for the bow stem I was not sure what the appropriate thickness would be so I played around with everything from 1/8″ to 3/16″ and up to 1/4″ most of my strips were 1/8″ thick.

Which meant that to create a 3″ thick stem I needed nineteen strips. Each strip needed to be buttered with epoxy and with so much surface area that turned out to be about 850ml of epoxy  or nearly a whole can. If all my strips were thicker I would have used much less epoxy. The lesson that I learned is that when laminating use the thickest strips that the mould will bear.

 

Nineteen strips of Douglas fir waiting for the epoxy

 

Then Fortunately Patrice came out to help me with the laying out of the stem on the mould.

a fair bit of epoxy squeeze out

Caledonia yawl project: planing the stern apron and stem to size 

I started this morning with a borrowed thickness planer, which allowed me to get the apron down to the specified 2″ thickness and the stem down to 1 3/4″ width.

running the apron through the thickness planer

checking that the edges are square
  
good view of the alternating grain pattern in the wood strips

The challenge was to keep checking the length of each piece to make sure it was square.  I had to use the hand planer a couple times to get it nice and square the whole length so that the thickness planer did not perpetuate the wrong angle.

bow apron all glued and clamped

Once I finished the getting the stern apron and stem to the right width, I started on the bow apron glued up with epoxy and microfibres for better gap filling in the lamination and strength.

 

Caledonia yawl project: dressing the stern apron and stem

On Saturday my assistant and I went to the lumber yard to get one more 2×3 to rip for the bow apron lamination and a couple 2×4’s that may end up being used for the floor timbers.

it was suprizingly chilly saturday, we got rain, wind and hail.
  
my assistant is ready to help me separate the apron and stem from the mould.
  
pulling the stem lamination away from the apron after the epoxy has cured
  
a good look at the epoxy that squeezed out and will have to be cleaned or planed off
 

Caledonia Yawl project: Gluing the the stern apron and stem laminate strips 

I had planned to glue the laminate strips in one go on Wednesday evening. But as things go when doing something for the first time, things take longer than expected. It was a cold evening and the epoxy was more viscous than I expected so spreading it on each laminate took much longer than I anticipated.

 

Dry-fitting the apron and stem

Continue reading Caledonia Yawl project: Gluing the the stern apron and stem laminate strips