Tag Archives: apron

Caledonia yawl project: placing the aprons

This was a scary set of cuts to make. The laminating and dressing of the aprons took so much time it seems that the act of shaping them to be ready to mate with the keelson was trepidatious.

the bow apron roughed in before cutting

my workspace is small so i had to get creative to brace the apron to cut it

the bow apron in place and held by a clamp

the stern apron in place

I also did some work on two pieces of cherry I picked up to see if I could make cleats and other rigging out of it.

the cherry ripped into managable slabs with a chain saw

Caledonia yawl project: bevelling the stems

Today my brother Maël helped me with the beveling of the stems. This will create a bigger mating surface for the planking. This will provide a mating surface for the planks.


We did the bulk of the work with the power planer and then finished with the block plane and the spokeshave. I did notice that because the laminated stem has alternating grain, it is important to have a sharp blade to avoid ripping out any of the grain.


I also managed to do the glue up of the rudder assembly.

Next up will be setting up the station molds and getting ready to bevel the keelson. This boat will soon finally be taking shape.

Caledonia yawl project: planing the stern apron and stem to size 

I started this morning with a borrowed thickness planer, which allowed me to get the apron down to the specified 2″ thickness and the stem down to 1 3/4″ width.

running the apron through the thickness planer

checking that the edges are square
  
good view of the alternating grain pattern in the wood strips

The challenge was to keep checking the length of each piece to make sure it was square.  I had to use the hand planer a couple times to get it nice and square the whole length so that the thickness planer did not perpetuate the wrong angle.

bow apron all glued and clamped

Once I finished the getting the stern apron and stem to the right width, I started on the bow apron glued up with epoxy and microfibres for better gap filling in the lamination and strength.

 

Caledonia yawl project: dressing the stern apron and stem

On Saturday my assistant and I went to the lumber yard to get one more 2×3 to rip for the bow apron lamination and a couple 2×4’s that may end up being used for the floor timbers.

it was suprizingly chilly saturday, we got rain, wind and hail.
  
my assistant is ready to help me separate the apron and stem from the mould.
  
pulling the stem lamination away from the apron after the epoxy has cured
  
a good look at the epoxy that squeezed out and will have to be cleaned or planed off
 

Caledonia yawl project: Making more sawdust

The process of cutting thin strips for laminations is a reductive one. As I don’t have a band saw, I’m using a table saw with a blade that is just shy of 1/8 thick. So for every 1/8″ thick strip I cut, I loose as much in sawdust.



I have just two more 2×3 boards to rip and I’ll have everything I need to glue up the bow and stern apron and stem.

Last scarf, moving on to the aprons and stems.

This weekend I was able to get back up to speed on my Caledonia yawl project after missing a week. I glued one of the two scarfs on strake 2 and will leave the other to do when I’ve got the station molds up as there is the most twist in the forefoot of strake 2 and it will be easier apparently to glue it down first and then do the scarfs.

IMG_9316
Scarf clamping mechanism. the 2×4 is screwed to the 3/4″ plywood to keep it from warping.

 

It was then time to tackle the apron and stems of this Caledonia Yawl. I’ve decided to try the method of laminating thin strips 1/8″ of Douglas fir with epoxy and West system 403 microfibre additive. The part I’ve been struggling with is that in Ian Oughtred’s plans the apron is 2″ wide. So I need to find a stock of wood that is at least 2.25 or 2.5 inches wide so that after it is laminated I have a little margin to plane it down and fair it.

Punching through the plans to create a pattern for the mould that will be used for the lamination.

 

But all the standar lumber jumps from 1.75″ to 3.5″ and it seems wasteful to rip down a 4×4 timber just to get something 2.5″ wide. After a visit to a couple lumber yards I decided to get a few vertical grain clear 2×3’s and rip them along the wide edge to get the width of strips I need.

The stems are only specified to be 1.75″ wide and so I am able to use rough fir 2x4s to cut the lamination strips and I’ll have 1/4 inch of material to plane off and to keep it true.

Transcribing the bow apron and stem pattern.

After using my full sized plans of the bow and stern apron and stem to punch through all the reference points onto my pattern board. I traced it all out again.

laying out the blocks I will use to clamp the laminated wood. Note that I’ve also put down packing tape to make sure the epoxy won’t stick to the pattern.