Tag Archives: Caledonia Yawl

Caledonia Yawl Project: Fitting the outer Stems and the Keel

So switching up the tasks from laying the strakes is a big shift and the boat is really feeling substantial under my hands now. Each action is now in relation to this compound shape and having to add or remove material to fit something new. I have started working on the stems.

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Bow stem before the bow is planed down to match the profile

Just placing the outer stems on the hull before I had done any preparation just started to transform my conception of the hull further.

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I have now started to plane down the faces of the stems to match the curve of the outer stems I had laminated with the inner stems months ago.

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Planing down the stems face. Nice to see the glue lines of the plank rebates.

I have now also cut the douglas fir stock I had been keeping for the outer keel pieces.

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Planing the hull to receive the stem and the outer keel
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The rough cut for all the pieced needed for the outer keel

I decided for simplicity’s sake to build the keel in four pieces and glue it together rather than shape one single piece of wood with the centre board slot cut out.  This approach should be just as strong and offer much more  ease of building.

I have also started to look for materials and hardware that will be needed.  most pressing will be more fir for the gunwales which I still have in stock. Early in the process I bought rough dimensional 2×4 fir from Dicks lumber that was still green. It has now seasoned for several months, I used some for the stem lamination and kept the rest for the outer keel and the gunwales.

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checking the plans regularly

So the hardest piece of hardware for me to source in Vancouver so far has been the half oval brass rub strips to go on to protect the keel and stems.  Either it is not possible to ship from US based distributors to Canada or shipping from Classic Marine in the UK would be cost prohibitive. I did find Tendercraftboats.ca
who are based in Ontario as a supplier of 1/2″ half oval but not 3/4″ half oval that is necessary.  Their catalogue was however very good and I was able to find 6″ long bronze machine screws for the rudder gudgeons that will get through both the outer and inner stems.
I also found that the supply a bronze bow eye that will work well with a 6″ machined bolt.  Peter at Tendercraft boats has been very helpful and I am looking forward to my shipment arriving.

 

For the half oval after some searching I considered UHMW (ultra high molecular weight plastic) which was done by Yeadon on his Hvalsoe 18.  I found a quote from Associated Plastics that was almost the same price as what I found from Alaska Copper & Brass who have an office in a suburb of Vancouver for brass half ovals. Going trough their catalogue I was able to find exactly the half oval dimensions I was looking for. Both 3/4″ and 1/2″ in 12′ lengths. I will end up with a little left over which I’m sure I’ll find used for elsewhere on the boat as rub strips or chafe protection.

 

 

Caledonia yawl project: the sixth strakes 

Today I started on the beveling of the landing for the sixth strakes. Before starting I laid them up in place to see how they landed and mark where I’ll cut the gains on the ends. It also feels good to get a preview of what it will look like.

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Cutting the gains on the very long sixth strake. Most of the gain is cut on the receiving fifth strake, (70-75%) but I like to cut the strake being fitted as well to leave a little more wood on both.
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The receiving gain all set to be glued up.
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The port sixth strake all whetted out with un-thickened epoxy before adding the thickening fibers West 406 & 403.
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All clamped up. It is 13-14 degrees C in Vancouver these days so it should set nicely overnight.

I was able to include my children with the removal of the clamps after it was glued up and they participated in roughing in the seventh strake on the starboard side.

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Removing the clamps the next day.
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Help with roughing in the seventh starboard strake.

 

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removing the clamps from the starboard sixth strake glue-up.

I’ll close this post with a little video of my daughter helping me with the removal of the clamps.

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Removing the clamps.

Caledonia yawl project: port strake #2

I have to squeeze my boat shed time between other competing obligations and interests. Not to mention a desire to hold on to a good nights sleep. As such my boat building seems to progress in micro-bursts.

I in a few hours I was able to cut the bevel and the gains on the port side garboard to get ready to glue the second strake.

cut gains on the garboard

The change in angle between the garboard and the second strake is large enough that it seems that the bevel takes away all the gain. So that the plank does not appear to sink down into the garboard.

dry fitting port side plank #2

Maybe it is possible to do it by cutting down deeper and reducing the gluing surface. But to my eye, it seemed better to focus on the fair landing of the plank on the stem rather than trying to worry about the gain on the garboards.

My hunch is that all the subsequent strakes have much smaller bevel angles and so the gains will look better.

Fingers crossed.

5/07/2016

I managed to get out at 8:15pm and glue the port strake #2 this evening. I’m pretty pleased with the way it looks.

port strake #2 glued, seen from the bow.

port strake #2 seen from the stern

Caledonia yawl project: cutting the gains on the garboard 

Today I tackled something new, cutting  the gains on the garboard so that the second strake appears to taper nicely to meet the profile of the garboard as it gets to the bow and stern stem.

To accomplish this I needed a rebate or a shoulder plane, which I don’t yet have in my tool kit. So I got a membership to the Vancouver Tool Library to allow me to access the tools I don’t yet have. As you might imagine shoulder planes or rebate planes are not super common tools, but they are precisely what makes the tool library such a wonderful service. I can easily imagine some kind of franchise where clusters of a few blocks have something similar.

Continue reading Caledonia yawl project: cutting the gains on the garboard 

Caledonia yawl project: glueing the garboard strakes 

Last night I escaped after dinner to the boat shed to keep the momentum established over the weekend. All the fairing and bevelling was with the intention of glueing the garboard strakes. The most interesting part was as I was dry fitting the garboard strakes to see the angles of the curve of the board at each floor.

dry fitting the port garboard strake and fairing the floor timbers

What happened after that was a lot of epoxy… Pre-coating the surfaces with unthickened epoxy to sink into the fibres, then applying epoxy thickened with West Systems 406 colloidal silica. For the next couple hours my latex gloves were wetted with epoxy and I had started a process I could not stop.

garboards all glued up and held in place with temporary drywall screws.

When I finally pulled off the gloves, the two garboard strakes were on, all the squeeze out epoxy cleaned off and it was one in the morning. Fortunately gluing is quiet so I did not bother any of the neighbours. It will be interesting to see how the second strakes line up, in the meantime it feels good to reach this milestone.

Caledonia yawl project: placing the aprons

This was a scary set of cuts to make. The laminating and dressing of the aprons took so much time it seems that the act of shaping them to be ready to mate with the keelson was trepidatious.

the bow apron roughed in before cutting

my workspace is small so i had to get creative to brace the apron to cut it

the bow apron in place and held by a clamp

the stern apron in place

I also did some work on two pieces of cherry I picked up to see if I could make cleats and other rigging out of it.

the cherry ripped into managable slabs with a chain saw

Caledonia yawl project: bevelling the stems

Today my brother Maël helped me with the beveling of the stems. This will create a bigger mating surface for the planking. This will provide a mating surface for the planks.


We did the bulk of the work with the power planer and then finished with the block plane and the spokeshave. I did notice that because the laminated stem has alternating grain, it is important to have a sharp blade to avoid ripping out any of the grain.


I also managed to do the glue up of the rudder assembly.

Next up will be setting up the station molds and getting ready to bevel the keelson. This boat will soon finally be taking shape.

Caledonia yawl project: rudder assembly 

Today with the help of my children we tackled building a couple shelves to make more room for tools. We also started working on the assembly of the retractable rudder. The plans show a little guide or sheave for the line that rudder pulls the rudder blade down. Figuring what to use for this  rather unique spot took a little creative thinking.

Continue reading Caledonia yawl project: rudder assembly 

Caledonia yawl project: final shaping of rudder and centreboard 

Experience in working on gyprock and mudding all the joints and corners and having to then sand them down to a fair blend to the straight board stock, is that it is worth spending a little more time sanding even if to the eye and to the fingers it appears to be smooth. 
  
Once I add the unidirectional carbon fibre and epoxy I will certainly discover new spots that are not quite right for the centreboard and rudder NACA profiles. Sanding down epoxy is much harder than bare cedar.

I’m feeling fairly confident about the shape now and I’m looking forward to adding the epoxy and carbon fibre.

   
 

  
This beautiful cedar will soon disappear behind layers of carbon, Kevlar and graphite. The only part of the boat I felt would benefit from additional strength beyond just wood fivers.