Caledonia Yawl: hull preparation

The work has progressed in small increments on the hull. Each step did not really reveal a significant visual transformation that might show up on the camera. But they are small changes that will allow the hull to look great once painted.
I glued up the keel and the stems:
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and after a few repeat visits added the keel pieced on either side of the centreboard slot.
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Then we got to work sanding and planing down the keel and stems so that they were fair to the eye.
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and distracted myself with paint selection ideas:
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and put fillets of epoxy mixed with low density fairing filler in all the laps.
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I then decided to add a small rub strip of wood on the lower edge of the sheer strake. The idea being that I like the way in helps to frame the sheer strake and that it might also serve a small function as well.
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The last step before really getting down to the final preparation for painting is the outer gunwhale.
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Caledonia yawl project: gluing the outer stems and keel

After a few days spent fitting the stems and trying to get the fit nice and snug, I finally said to myself: good enough any small gaps left will be filled easily by the thickened epoxy.
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The bow section of the keel was too stiff to form to the curve of the hull so I ripped it into two strips that fit nicely under the stem in what I hope will be an elegant scarf. I had looked closely at the plans where Ian Oughtred seems to show the outer keel glued on top of the bow stem. But the piece I laminated seemed to be easier to scarf in this way. The length of the glued surface is shorter, but I’m fairly confident the joint will be plenty strong.
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The stern stem was a similar decision, however I did not have to rip the keel into two strips.

Caledonia Yawl Project: Fitting the outer Stems and the Keel

So switching up the tasks from laying the strakes is a big shift and the boat is really feeling substantial under my hands now. Each action is now in relation to this compound shape and having to add or remove material to fit something new. I have started working on the stems.

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Bow stem before the bow is planed down to match the profile

Just placing the outer stems on the hull before I had done any preparation just started to transform my conception of the hull further.

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I have now started to plane down the faces of the stems to match the curve of the outer stems I had laminated with the inner stems months ago.

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Planing down the stems face. Nice to see the glue lines of the plank rebates.

I have now also cut the douglas fir stock I had been keeping for the outer keel pieces.

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Planing the hull to receive the stem and the outer keel
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The rough cut for all the pieced needed for the outer keel

I decided for simplicity’s sake to build the keel in four pieces and glue it together rather than shape one single piece of wood with the centre board slot cut out.  This approach should be just as strong and offer much more  ease of building.

I have also started to look for materials and hardware that will be needed.  most pressing will be more fir for the gunwales which I still have in stock. Early in the process I bought rough dimensional 2×4 fir from Dicks lumber that was still green. It has now seasoned for several months, I used some for the stem lamination and kept the rest for the outer keel and the gunwales.

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checking the plans regularly

So the hardest piece of hardware for me to source in Vancouver so far has been the half oval brass rub strips to go on to protect the keel and stems.  Either it is not possible to ship from US based distributors to Canada or shipping from Classic Marine in the UK would be cost prohibitive. I did find Tendercraftboats.ca
who are based in Ontario as a supplier of 1/2″ half oval but not 3/4″ half oval that is necessary.  Their catalogue was however very good and I was able to find 6″ long bronze machine screws for the rudder gudgeons that will get through both the outer and inner stems.
I also found that the supply a bronze bow eye that will work well with a 6″ machined bolt.  Peter at Tendercraft boats has been very helpful and I am looking forward to my shipment arriving.

 

For the half oval after some searching I considered UHMW (ultra high molecular weight plastic) which was done by Yeadon on his Hvalsoe 18.  I found a quote from Associated Plastics that was almost the same price as what I found from Alaska Copper & Brass who have an office in a suburb of Vancouver for brass half ovals. Going trough their catalogue I was able to find exactly the half oval dimensions I was looking for. Both 3/4″ and 1/2″ in 12′ lengths. I will end up with a little left over which I’m sure I’ll find used for elsewhere on the boat as rub strips or chafe protection.

 

 

The seventh strakes (sheerstrake) and the Whiskey plank

The last two strakes,  are called the sheerstrakes as they  mark the sheer line of the boat’s profile.  The month of December has been colder than usual and so the progress has been arrested a little as I waited for the weather windows when the temperature is above 5°C or close enough so that the epoxy will set.

I was able to get the starboard sheerstrake glued early in December,  but the port Sheerstrake had to wait for the Christmas break.

Strake 7

    Starboard strake no. 7
Port seventh strake all glued up.
Seen from inside where I crawl to remove any squeeze out glue

All glued up and ready for the outer stems soon

Once the glue set for the port side I was able to declare the hull complete.  Tradition has it that the occasion is celebrated with with a little whiskey.

Next up is the planing of the bow and stern stems so that I can glue the outer stem pieces I made earlier.

Caledonia yawl project: the sixth strakes 

Today I started on the beveling of the landing for the sixth strakes. Before starting I laid them up in place to see how they landed and mark where I’ll cut the gains on the ends. It also feels good to get a preview of what it will look like.

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Cutting the gains on the very long sixth strake. Most of the gain is cut on the receiving fifth strake, (70-75%) but I like to cut the strake being fitted as well to leave a little more wood on both.
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The receiving gain all set to be glued up.
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The port sixth strake all whetted out with un-thickened epoxy before adding the thickening fibers West 406 & 403.
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All clamped up. It is 13-14 degrees C in Vancouver these days so it should set nicely overnight.

I was able to include my children with the removal of the clamps after it was glued up and they participated in roughing in the seventh strake on the starboard side.

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Removing the clamps the next day.
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Help with roughing in the seventh starboard strake.

 

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removing the clamps from the starboard sixth strake glue-up.

I’ll close this post with a little video of my daughter helping me with the removal of the clamps.

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Removing the clamps.

Caledonia yawl project: Fifth strakes 

I’ve squeezed in a few visits at the end of August and early September to be able to glue up the fifth strakes. 


Last night I came with my little accomplice to check on the set of the epoxy and remove the clamps.

strakes number six roughed in


We pulled out the sixth strakes and just clamped them on before doing any bevelling to see how they landed. They seem to look quite fair and they really complete the turn of the bilges so that the boat’s form is really taking shape.

Caledonia yawl project: strake #4

There is something satisfying about establishing a rhythm on this project. The planking is one of the few areas where there is an opportunity to repeat a series of steps and learn to improve at each iteration. 

cutting the gains on both sides

The movements become familiar, the use of the tools more intuitive and the fairness of the bevels and gains improves. 

There has been an addition to the tool chest. After three trips to the Vancouver tool library to borrow the same rabbet plane, I realized that it was maybe worthwhile to invest. So I bought a rebate plane that just uses a 1″ chisel as the iron from Lee Valley.

starboard strake 4 glued up

It was 30 degrees Celsius today in the shade so I had to work fast even with the slow hardner today.